Low End TV’s Guide to Cutting TV Costs

Almost everyone complains about the cost of cable and satellite TV, but few actually takes the steps necessary to ditch those overpriced services and use their internet connection to fill the void. That’s our goal in this series of articles.

Step one is picking the right antenna so you can pick up local TV stations, since they are not on the Internet. We’ll look at your options and help you find the right antenna for your needs.

Netflix logoA lot of people are using Netflix to watch movies and TV shows that are available on DVD or Blu-ray, and Hulu Plus is letting people do a lot of their network TV viewing online. We’ll examine those services, along with ways to access other “premium” content offered by cable and satellite providers.

We’ll look at Apple TV, Chromecast, Roku, and other devices that can replace your cable box or DVR, as well as how they integrate with your Macs, Windows, and Linux PCs. And we’ll look at your options for connecting your Mac, Windows, or Linux machine to your HD TV set.

It’s just another way of helping you save your hard-earned money.

Hulu Plus

At home, my wife and I recently trimmed DirecTV back to the lowest possible level, and we’re using Netflix and Hulu Plus on our Wii to access most of the content we no longer have via satellite. We plan to get a Roku for HD video next month and add a good rooftop antenna in March, assuming the roof is free of ice and snow.

After that, we’ll be looking at DVR options for those times when there are two or more shows on live TV at the same time or shows that aren’t available through Hulu Plus.

We’ll keep you posted!

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One thought on “Low End TV’s Guide to Cutting TV Costs

  1. I’m really looking forward to this section. I’ve been considereing changing to OTA from our Cable provider here in Quebec. I was considering using a dual-Tuner atsc and an old Mac mini as a PVR.