Resurrecting a Clamshell iBook, Part 4

Back in 2007, my 300 MHz 1999 Clamshell iBook’s usefulness was questionable, but that’s definitely not the case now, thanks to the CompactFlash-IDE drive I installed. Almost every application in OS X 10.3 Panther loads within 20 seconds (most within five or ten seconds), and in Mac OS 9, everything loads even faster.

Resurrecting a Clamshell iBook, Part 3

On one fateful December day in 2007, my original 300 MHz Clamshell iBook suddenly stopped running on battery power. For four years, I spent hundreds of dollars on my iBook, replacing several internal components, including the logic board and the charger board. Why I didn’t think to replace the battery is beyond me, but I eventually […]

Resurrecting a Clamshell iBook, Part 1

There’s nothing like the original iBook, even twelve years after it was first made. The unique styling, the tough case, and the optional built-in AirPort 802.11b WiFi all make it a very functional notebook computer. Add to that the incredible battery life for its day, and you’ve got the makings of a great road warrior […]

The 25 Most Important Macs

2009 – Others have published their thoughts on the Best Mac Ever, the 10 Best Macs, and the 25 Best Macs, but I’m taking a different approach. I want to identify the 25 most important Macs ever, clones included. (In some cases, I’ll lump together two or more models that were introduced simultaneously.)

10 of the Most Important Macs Ever

2006 – Over the past few years, I’ve been cutting back on some of the old Macs lying around the house. At one point I had an example of just about every Mac made until the late 1990s. As software is updated and time goes on, most of these computers become less and less useful […]

I Love My iBook, but I Miss My Mac SE

Ten years ago this month I started graduate school, and I was determined not to wait in line at the computer center or rely on the kindness of friends who had their own computers. I needed my own machine. I had used PCs at work, but a friend let me use his Mac Plus to […]

iBook SE (FireWire)

The second-generation iBook Special Edition (SE) adds key lime as an alternative to graphite. It replaces the 366 MHz G3 processor of the earlier iBook SE with the new G3e running at 466 MHz. The G3e includes an on-chip L2 cache that runs at full CPU speed for improved processor efficiency (the larger backside cache […]

iBook (FireWire)

The second-generation iBook replaces the bright blueberry and tangerine of the original iBook with a more sophisticated indigo blue and a bright key lime. New features include FireWire and video output. 

iBook SE (366 MHz)

The iBook has been the best selling portable computer since it began shipping in late September 1999. It’s also been picked on for having too little memory, too small a hard drive, and garish (some say “girlie”) colors.

More than an iMac to Go

The iBook has been dubbed by Apple as “an iMac to go,” but the iBook has a lot of new features in addition to its portability. This is a guide to help you know the big and small differences between the iMac and the iBook.

The iBook Market

1999: Admit it, Mac fans, you’d love one. Sure, it may not be the right Mac for you, but the iBook (like the iMac) calls out to be embraced. Buy me. Use me. Show the world your colors.

iBook: The Price Is Right

1999: I’ll admit it right up front: I was expecting the iBook to come in at about $1,400, not $1,600. But then, I was expecting a different computer. A lot of us were expecting something smaller and lighter than the Lombard PowerBook G3.

Enter the iBook

1999 – Many people have tried to copy Apple’s idea of a cool translucent plastic space age looking computer. Well, now Apple’s done it themselves. Enter the iBook.

Original iBook

Apple’s first consumer portable since the PowerBook 150 was discontinued at under US$1,000 in late 1995, the $1,599 iBook was available in blueberry and tangerine. Apple billed it as the world’s second fastest portable computer – only the Lombard PowerBook G3 outperforms it.