iMac G5 (2004)

Where did the computer go? It’s behind the flat panel display in the iMac G5! And the mouse and keyboard are available as wireless models with Bluetooth (which remains optional and can only be installed at the factory) – that means less cable clutter than most users are used to. Not just smaller and lighter, […]

eMac USB 2.0 (2004)

Incremental improvement were the name of the game for the 2004 eMac. This edition gets a 25% speed boost for both the CPU and the memory bus compared with the 1 GHz 2003 eMac. The G4 CPU used in this model also has a larger level 2 cache (512 KB vs. 256 KB), which further improves performance.

20″ iMac G4 (Late 2003)

The biggest iMac to date, the 20″ model has a 1680 x 1050 display – and due to the weight of the screen, the base has to be heavier to counterbalance it. At 40.1 pounds, this is the heaviest iMac G4 yet. Except for the screen size and weight, the 20″ iMac G4 is identical […]

17″ iMac G4 (Late 2003)

The first iMac to reach 1.25 GHz, the 17″ G4 iMac has a wide aspect ratio “cinema” type screen and displays 1440 x 900 pixels – just perfect for DVDs. Along with the 1.0 GHz 15″ model, it’s the first iMac to support USB 2.0, and it’s also the first to sport GeForce 5200 graphics.

eMac ATI Graphics (2003)

After a year on the market, Apple speed bumped the eMac from a top speed of 800 MHz to 1 GHz while moving from a 100 MHz data bus to 133 MHz and adding support for 802.11g AirPort Extreme WiFi. Apple also switched from the Nvidia graphics of the original eMac to Radeon 7500 on this model […]

17″ iMac G4 (Early 2003)

The first iMac to reach 1 GHz, the 17″ G4 iMac has a wide aspect ratio “cinema” type screen and displays 1440 by 900 pixels – just perfect for DVDs. Other improvements over the old 800 MHz model include a slot for an 802.11g AirPort Extreme card, space for internal Bluetooth, 64 MB of video […]

17″ iMac G4 (Mid 2002)

Announced at the Macworld Expo on July 17, 2002, the 17″ G4 iMac has a wide aspect ratio “cinema” type screen and displays 1440 by 900 pixels – just perfect for DVDs. The new screen is about 1.6″ wider than the one on the 15″ iMac and just a bit taller, and the 17″ iMac […]

eMac (2002)

Rumors of a 17″ iMac had been circulating since 1998. Apple finally did it by introducing the eMac to the education market at the end of April 2002 – and to the consumer market that June. The base 700 MHz CD-ROM model does not include a modem; all other models have one. The top-end 800 […]

700 MHz iMac (Summer 2001)

The July 2001 iMac came in speeds of 500, 600, and 700 MHz, although the 700 wasn’t available until August. All models included CD-RW drives and at least 128 MB of RAM. Except for the $799 indio-only model, each version was available in snow (white). The 500 MHz models were available in indigo, and the […]

600 MHz iMac (Summer 2001)

The July 2001 iMac came in speeds of 500, 600, and 700 MHz, although the 700 wasn’t available until August. All models included CD-RW drives and at least 128 MB of RAM. Except for the $799 model, only available in indigo, each version was available in snow (white). The 500 MHz models were available in […]

500 MHz iMac (Summer 2001)

The Summer 2001 iMac came in speeds of 500, 600, and 700 MHz, although the 700 wasn’t available until August. All models included CD-RW drives and at least 128 MB of RAM. The $799 CD-ROM model was only available in indigo. The CD-RW model was available in indigo and snow white.

400 MHz iMac (Early 2001)

The 400 MHz iMac 2001 is the slowest member of the iMac 2001 family and has the least features. It is the only model to use the original G3 (PowerPC 750) processor and the only model that doesn’t include a CD-RW drive. To all intents, this is last year’s 400 MHz iMac DV at a […]

iMac DV SE (Summer 2000)

The new iMac DV Special Edition, available in Graphite or Snow, increased speed from 400 MHz on the original DV SE to 500 MHz and boosted the hard drive from 13 GB to 30 GB – all without increasing the price. The 2000 iMac DV Special Edition ships with the Apple Pro Mouse and Apple […]

400 MHz iMac DV (Summer 2000)

This model, available in Indigo and Ruby, replaced the earlier iMac DV. Both models share a 400 MHz processor. Other than colors, the biggest difference between the new iMac DV and the previous model with the same name is the use of a CD-ROM drive instead of DVD.

Macs and Digital Video

2000 – I am interested in doing digital video (DV) editing – as shown in the new iMac commercials. Is there any way I can do it with my older Mac by buying a FireWire card? If not, what Mac do you suggest for digital video editing?

400 MHz iMac DV SE (Late 1999)

The iMac DV Special Edition places the regular iMac DV in a graphite case, boosts memory to 128 MB for better video editing performance, and replaces the DV’s 10 GB hard drive with a 13 GB drive. Otherwise, everything is the same: DVD-ROM, FireWire 400, 2x AGP RAGE 128 VR video, and so on.

400 MHz iMac DV (Late 1999)

Development of the “Kihei” iMac began the day after the first iMac shipped. The new model is an evolutionary development of Apple’s 2,000,000 unit seller. The first iMacs with a DVD-ROM drive, the iMac DV  and DV SE run a lightning fast 400 MHz G3 processor on a 100 MHz system bus and are the […]

Introduction to FireWire

By now you’ve probably heard of FireWire, the new high speed standard for moving data between devices. Also known as IEEE Standard 1394 or P1394, FireWire was invented by Apple as a faster alternative to SCSI in its many permutations.

Macintosh Makes the Connection

1997 – Surprising to many, the first Macs didn’t have SCSI. The Apple design team created a compact, closed box with a disk drive, CPU, monitor, 128 KB of RAM, keyboard and mouse ports, a floppy drive port, and two serial ports. The serial ports were the secret – they could support a 230.4 Kbps […]