17″ iMac G5 (iSight)

Innovation has come back to the iMac. Just as the original iMac introduced USB to the Macintosh and eliminated the floppy drive, the Late 2005 iMac G5 introduces the PCI-Express bus for video, DDR2 memory, and an integrated iSight webcam while eliminating the internal modem.

iMac G5 (iSight)

Innovation has come back to the iMac. Just as the original iMac introduced USB to the Macintosh and eliminated the floppy drive, the October 2005 iMac G5 introduces the PCI-Express bus for video, DDR2 memory, and an integrated iSight webcam while eliminating the internal modem. Apple took the popular iMac G5, built in iSight, made […]

Mac mini (Late 2005)

The original Mac mini was introduced in January 2005 at 1.25 GHz and 1.42 GHz. In July, Apple bumped base RAM from 256 MB to 512 MB. The Late 2005 model boosts CPU speeds to 1.33 GHz and 1.5 GHz. The SuperDrive is bumped from 4x to 8x, can now burn dual-layer discs, and also […]

20″ iMac G5 (Mid 2005)

The May 2005 revision of the iMac G5 got a 200 MHz speed boost, bringing it to 2.0 GHz. Other improvements include an 8x dual-layer SuperDrive, better video, gigabit ethernet, and an ambient light sensor (ALS). 512 MB of RAM is now standard across the line, making the entry-level model more responsive and possibly saving […]

iMac G5 (Mid 2005)

The May 2005 revision of the iMac G5 got a 200 MHz speed boost, bringing it to 1.8 GHz and 2.0 GHz. Other improvements include an 8x dual-layer SuperDrive, better video, gigabit ethernet, and an ambient light sensor (ALS). 512 MB of RAM is now standard across the line, making the entry-level model more responsive […]

eMac (2005)

Incremental improvement seems to be the name of the game for the eMac once again. The 2005 models gets a modest 14% speed boost compared with the 1.25 GHz 2004 eMac. The G4 CPU used in this model has the same 512 KB level 2 cache as the 2004 model.

1.25 GHz eMac (Education)

Again in 2005, Apple made a slower version of the eMac available to the education market – again with CD-ROM or no optical drive at all. It also lacks the modem of the consumer machine.

Mac mini (Early 2005)

Never before had Apple sold a $500 Macintosh. Never before had Apple been poised to grow its market share like it hoped to with the Mac mini. The tiny Mac mini (6.5″ square, 2″ high, 2.9 lb.) has incredibly minimalist design. On the front, there’s just a slot-loading optical drive and a power light. On […]

20″ iMac G5 (2004)

Where did the computer go? It’s behind the flat panel display in the iMac G5! And the mouse and keyboard are available as wireless models with Bluetooth (which remains optional and can only be installed at the factory) – that means less cable clutter than most users are used to. Not just smaller and lighter, […]

iMac G5 (2004)

Where did the computer go? It’s behind the flat panel display in the iMac G5! And the mouse and keyboard are available as wireless models with Bluetooth (which remains optional and can only be installed at the factory) – that means less cable clutter than most users are used to. Not just smaller and lighter, […]

eMac USB 2.0 (2004)

Incremental improvement were the name of the game for the 2004 eMac. This edition gets a 25% speed boost for both the CPU and the memory bus compared with the 1 GHz 2003 eMac. The G4 CPU used in this model also has a larger level 2 cache (512 KB vs. 256 KB), which further improves performance.

1 GHz eMac (Education)

Based on the 1.25 GHz 2004 eMac, the education-only model includes a 1 GHz G4 CPU that was available either with a CD-ROM drive or no optical drive at all. The education eMac also lacks the built-in modem of the consumer model.

20″ iMac G4 (Late 2003)

The biggest iMac to date, the 20″ model has a 1680 x 1050 display – and due to the weight of the screen, the base has to be heavier to counterbalance it. At 40.1 pounds, this is the heaviest iMac G4 yet. Except for the screen size and weight, the 20″ iMac G4 is identical […]

17″ iMac G4 (Late 2003)

The first iMac to reach 1.25 GHz, the 17″ G4 iMac has a wide aspect ratio “cinema” type screen and displays 1440 x 900 pixels – just perfect for DVDs. Along with the 1.0 GHz 15″ model, it’s the first iMac to support USB 2.0, and it’s also the first to sport GeForce 5200 graphics.