21 Years of Low End Mac

When I started adding some profiles of Macs to my personal web space in April 1997, who would have thought that it would grow into something enduring? We used Macs at work, I had a Mac at home, and I was teaching myself how to make web pages using Claris Home Page. So I put […]

PowerBooks with CardBus Support

The PC Card was originally called the PCMCIA card when it was launched in November 1990. It is compatible with the Japanese JEIDA memory card 4.0 standard and supports a 16-bit ISA-compatible data bus. PC Cards may be 5V, 3.3V, or both, and 3.3V cards have a key that prevents them from being plugged into […]

Quadra 700: Once the Fastest Mac, Now a Steal

The Macintosh Quadra 700. This was always a Mac that interested me; essentially the same old beige tower, but with a twist. Sitting on molded plastic legs, the tower has a vertically placed 3 1/2” floppy drive at the top center of the computer. This Macintosh has a 25 MHz Motorola 68040 processor, can take […]

Mac Resources in Other Languages

Most of the visitors to Low End Mac work comfortably in English, whether they grew up speaking it or learned it along the way. We think Low End Mac is a wonderful resource, one of many on the Mac Web, which has a wealth of wonderful English-language resources.

Low End Mac’s GeoPort Guide

When Steve Jobs unveiled the first iMac, he shocked the tech community by jettisoning the 3.5″ floppy drive and Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) port in favor of new technologies like the Universal Serial Bus (USB). He was perfectly willing to kick to the curb technologies that had been cultivated at Apple, such as the little-understood […]

Unearthing a Classic

Patience is a virtue, or so it is said. It came in handy with a local seller who was selling a 1991 Apple “for parts” (as the ad stated). It was a small nostalgia and collectibles store that seemed to specialize in music, bikes, and anything else that caught the owner’s eye.

The Round Mouse That Could Have Been

Life was simple when the iMac came in only one color, Bondi blue. The computer, keyboard, and mouse were all trimmed in Bondi blue and looked great together. Third party manufacturers could come close enough to Apple’s color to look good as well. And then Apple changed everything with Macs in different colors.

Our Facebook Group by the Numbers

Facebook is really good at providing all sorts of information about groups. For instance, our group has 5,317 members, but only 3,356 have been active in the past 28 days. Men make up 89% of the group; women, 10%; and “other” or unidentified, 1%.

Nerds Helping Nerds?

We had a good-natured discussion in our Facebook group on Thursday when I laughingly posted that Low End Mac’s new motto was Nerds Helping Nerds. And that led to a discussion of the meaning and negativity sometimes associated with the words geek and nerd. And the dangers inherent in calling ourselves geniuses.

Why I Still Use the Camino Browser Almost Every Day

Camino is a port of Netscape specifically to Mac OS X. It began in late 2001 when Mike Pinkerton and Vidur Apparao launched a proof-of-concept project to embed Netscape’s Gecko rendering engine in a Cocoa application. Cocoa is Apple’s native object-oriented application programming interface (API) for Mac OS X and is rooted in NeXTstep, which […]