Adding USB 2.0 to a Titanium PowerBook G4

2009 – Despite my 867 MHz Titanium PowerBook G4 (TiBook) being introduced in November 2002, making it nearly seven years old, it is still an excellent machine. Being an 867 MHz model, it is the earliest Titanium model to officially support Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard, and it copes with it very well.

Lombard, the Forgotten PowerBook

In 2005, I decided I needed a laptop computer. After using a Mac for a number of years, my first choice would have been an Apple laptop, but funds were tight, so I opted for a Windows machine. However, using Windows on a daily basis got the better of me, and I decided I had […]

PowerBook G3 Series I and II

code name: WallStreet There were two different sets of WallStreet PowerBooks. Series I was introduced in May 1998; Series II (also known as “PDQ”) replaced it that September. These were Apple’s first notebook computers that didn’t automatically ship with a floppy drive, although it was a popular option. These were the first PowerBooks to offer […]

PDQ PowerBook G3 Series II

This PowerBook G3 Series II, code named PDQ, was announced Sept. 1, 1998. Changes from the earlier G3 Series include a 66 MHz motherboard for all versions and standard 14.1″ screen. The 1024 x 768 screen will also automatically scale, allowing users to emulate 640 x 480 and 800 x 600 resolutions.

WallStreet PowerBook G3 Series

The PowerBook G3 Series, code named WallStreet, was designed around the same PowerPC 750 (aka G3) processor as the original PowerBook G3 – but don’t confuse it with the original. Although they bear a similar name, this was a whole new computer. Available at three different speeds (233, 250, and 292 MHz) and with three […]

PowerBook 1400

The PowerBook 1400, the first CD-ROM equipped notebook computer, was available in several different configurations over its lifespan, including two screen types (dual-scan and active matrix) and three processor speeds (117, 133, and 166 MHz). The 1400c has an active matrix display, while the 1400cs model uses the less expensive dual-scan passive matrix technology. (That […]

PowerBook Duo 2300c

The PowerBook Duo 2300c was Apple’s only PowerBook Duo based on a PowerPC CPU. To make the 2300c compatible with Duo Docks for earlier models, the 100 MHz 64-bit PowerPC 603e CPU was used on a 33 MHz 32-bit bus, which seriously compromised performance.

PowerBook 190

The PowerBook 190 was Apple’s last model based on a Motorola 68040 CPU. The base model has a 640 x 480 4-bit passive matrix grayscale display; the 190cs has an 8-bit color display.

PowerBook 190cs

The PowerBook 190 was Apple’s last model based on a Motorola 68040 CPU. The 190cs has an 8-bit dual-scan passive matrix color display. Apple eliminated the internal modem bay and the ethernet port found in the previous 500 series, forcing buyers to acquire these items separately.

PowerBook 550c

Blackbird was Apple’s code name for a line of PowerBooks based on Motorola’s 68LC040 and 68040 processors. (The LC version draws less power and has no FPU.) The PowerBook 550c was available only in Japan. Differences from the rest of the 500-series include use of regular 68040 (not the stripped down 68LC040), a 750 MB […]

PowerBook 150

The 33 MHz PowerBook 150 replaced the 25 MHz PowerBook 145b in July 1994. It offered faster performance at a lower price and was the final model in the 140/145/145b/150 line of economical PowerBooks.

PowerBook 520c

Blackbird was Apple’s code name for its first line of PowerBooks based on the 68LC040 processor. (The LC version of the 68040 draws less power and has no FPU.) The 500 series included several firsts: the first portable with a trackpad, the first with a PCMCIA (later PC Card) slot, the first with stereo speakers, the […]

PowerBook 520

Blackbird was Apple’s code name for a new line of PowerBooks based on the 68LC040 processor. (The LC version of the 68040 draws less power and has no FPU.) The 500 series included several firsts: the first portable with a trackpad, the first with a PCMCIA (later PC Card) slot, the first with stereo speakers, the […]

PowerBook Duo 280c

Apple upped the ante by moving from the 68030 to the 68LC040 processor on the Duo 280 and 280c in May 1994. (The 68LC040 is a low power version of the 68040 with the internal FPU disabled.) Other than the CPU, this is essentially a Duo 270c.

PowerBook 540c

Blackbird was Apple’s code name for its first line of PowerBooks based on the 68LC040 processor. (The LC version of the 68040 draws less power and has no FPU.) The 500 series included several firsts: the first portable with a trackpad, the first with a PCMCIA (later PC Card) slot, the first with stereo speakers, […]